Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (8/8) – Old floor joists in refurbishment projects

Continuation of Part 7: Particular challenges on refurbishment projects

Old floor joists in refurbishment projects /penetrations of masonry/joists

Typical leaks can be found at the joist bearings of timber roof joists in the masonry structure. The bricks between the joists are generally not plastered. On refurbishment projects, joints with the old masonry can lead to leaks; on new buildings, non-mortared butt joints between bricks can cause leaks. Even if a layer of plaster has been applied, airtight joints to the joists are generally neglected. This is indicated by air currents through the joints between old wooden floorboards detected during blower door tests.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (7/8) – Particular challenges on refurbishment projects

Continuation of Part 6: Problem with skylights: adhesive bonds at corners

Airtightness on refurbishment projects is particularly challenging, as uneven subsurfaces and walls that are not straight are commonly encountered. These are often covered over with a lightweight wall made of plasterboard to create a clean, even new surface in refurbishment situations. However, non-sealed elements such as unplastered masonry in the building envelope are generally not taken care of first.

Air flow is possible behind structures of this type, and these structures need to be improved. The rule of thumb here is: applying coatings is better than fitting cladding over these surfaces. It is sufficient to apply a smooth plaster finish to unplastered or porous masonry areas in order to prevent the flow of air. Alternatively, a sprayable plastic sealant can be applied to the surface. To achieve more reliable results, blower door testing during construction can identify weaknesses in this regard at an early stage.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (6/8) – Problem with skylights: adhesive bonds at corners

Continuation of Part 5: Care required at the corners of plastic windows:

A challenging corner joint arises when installing skylights. The membrane is guided up to the surrounding window profile all around the window and has to be stuck there in a reliable, sealed manner, even at the corners. Particular care must be taken at the corners. An experienced tradesperson can achieve an uninterrupted airtight seal here using prefolded adhesive tapes. Prefabricated corners, which may be adapted for the width of the surrounding window profile that is present if necessary, are a reliable alternative.

The corners of skylights always show up first in blower door tests. It is important to start by sealing the corner and then to seal the surrounding window profile all around the window. This challenge can be solved by installation tradespeople by folding adhesive tape to create a corner element.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (5/8) – Care required at the corners of plastic windows:

Continuation of Part 4: The challenge: pipe feed-throughs

The position of the airtight layer must be defined

Leaks at windows. Photo: ‘Zieht wie Hechtsupp’ – the construction portal for leaks, damage to structures and other curiosities.

Plastic windows are commonly used in practice on our building sites, but are often associated with a lot of leaks. This is why providers of blower door measurements like to test the joints around these windows. The reason for this is that air can flow freely in the surrounding window profile. The installation guidelines of the RAL quality seal for windows and doors specifies the closing of surrounding window profiles with a special profile – but this is rarely done in everyday practice. However, these air flows can be interrupted by using some joint adhesive.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (4/8) – The challenge: pipe feed-throughs

Continuation of Part 3: The challenge: cables passing underneath joists

The number of pipe feed-throughs through airtight layers is increasing continuously. The familiar vent pipe for the sanitary drain pipe is no longer the only candidate by any means! However, installation technicians for domestic hot water heating, photovoltaic systems and ventilation systems often show little consideration for this issue. Damage can be avoided by careful planning and early intervention. A lot of prefabricated solutions are now available that can be implemented quickly and cost-effectively.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (3/8) – The challenge: cables passing underneath joists

Continuation of Part 2: The challenge: sealing cable looms

Kabelbaum über Unterzug abdichten
It is recommended to create a cable tunnel in the case of middle purlins or joists where cables come out on the other side.

If cable bundles pass though interior walls, middle purlins or joists and thus penetrate the airtight layer twice, the cables need to be stuck in an airtight manner on both sides. An alternate solution is to create a cable tunnel using prefabricated shaped elements or a box made from airtight wood-based panels. The amount of work involved in this case is significantly lower and the end result is better.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (2/8) – The challenge: sealing cable looms

Continuation of Part 1: Typical leaks: cable feed-throughs for electrical installations

Penetration by single cables and pipes is relatively easy to solve. If adhesive tape is being used, the following steps have proven themselves in practice: first stick the adhesive tape to the cable, and then to the airtight membrane so that an L-shaped adhesive bond with both sides is formed. If more conduits or cables penetrate the airtight layer, the work needed to create an adhesive joint using adhesive tape or adhesive from a tube will be more laborious. Another disadvantage is that the adhesive comes apart as soon as you pull on it.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (1/8) – typical leaks: cable feed-throughs for electrical installations

Properly installed air sealing is the basis for energy-efficient buildings that are protected against damage to structures. In addition, planners and tradespeople are liable for any damage that may occur later in the case of flawed planning and installation. Blower door tests during the construction phase and after completion show whether the values demanded by regulations and standards (German Energy Saving Ordinance, DIN standards) are achieved in practice. These tests also show where leaks are present in the building envelope.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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BAU 2019: At Stand 200 in Hall B6, the focus is on healthier buildings

pro clima presents projects, products and a guiding principle

How does the selection of construction materials and the professional handling of these materials influence the construction of healthy buildings to live in? This is just one of the questions that MOLL pro clima is considering at BAU 2019. The overall issue of healthier buildings is the focus of the trade fair presence of pro clima, the specialist in windtightness and airtightness. At the heart of Stand 200 in Hall B6, we will be presenting our joint projects with the Sentinel Haus Institut – such as the current research project “My Future Office”, which deals with sustainable, healthier office buildings. However, a significant amount of space is also dedicated to both new and tried-and-tested products that pro clima has developed with the issue of healthy living environments very much in the foreground.

Finding out more, discussing technical issues, experiencing new products at BAU 2019: At the pro clima Stand 200 in Hall B6, everything will be focused on windtight and airtight building envelopes and their importance for achieving healthier buildings.

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Always on hand and easy to use: TESCON SPRIMER – the new spray-on primer from pro clima

Dried-out products in paint cans and the time-consuming cleaning of brushes are no longer a problem with the new TESCON SPRIMER.

There will generally be dust present anywhere that bonding primer is being applied. Primer liquids and brushes can easily become dirty. TESCON SPRIMER now provides a solution to these problems: this innovative primer is applied directly from a spray can, which means that it stays clean – and you don’t to worry about accidentally knocking over cans of primer or having them dry out either! This spray-on primer is ready to use in an instant, can be applied at precisely the right location thanks to the adjustable nozzle, and has the same application properties that you are familiar with from other pro clima bonding primers.

Application also possible at temperatures below zero Celsius

Simply shake the can forcefully a few times and you’re ready to start applying TESCON SPRIMER, even during frosty conditions. The bonding primer penetrates deep into the application surface and strengthens dusty subsurfaces or subsurfaces with insufficient load-bearing capacity. It is permitted for wood fibre underlay panels and other similarly absorbent subsurfaces to be still somewhat moist when the primer is sprayed on. Work can also be continued on these surfaces – for example, the TESCON VANA all-round adhesive tape or the adhesive sealing tapes for plaster in the CONTEGA family of products can be applied without any waiting time being necessary. However, TESCON SPRIMER must dry fully for it to achieve its final level of strength.

TESCON SPRIMER can be sprayed on at precisely the location where a reliable adhesive bond is to be created.

Focus on health issues

Installation technicians have often enquired to pro clima about a primer that could be applied from a spray can, reports Michael Förster, an Application Technology specialist at this Schwetzingen-based airtightness and windtightness specialist company: “It took a while to create a product to meet this need, as we wanted our new primer to be a lot better in terms of environmental friendliness and occupational health and safety than the spray-on primers that are already available on the market.”

“The advantage of spray-on primers is that they are significantly easier to work with than similar products in bottles. After all, you don’t need a brush and you can apply the product precisely where you need it by spraying it on. No lumps form in the primer either. I am delighted that pro clima is now able to offer TESCON SPRIMER – as I know that a lot of attention has been paid to sustainability and that the propellant is not harmful to my health or the health of my colleagues,” says the master carpenter and construction engineer Alexander Erny from Mannheim. He is also impressed by the ease of use of TESCON SPRIMER. The spray can is handy to carry around and is always on hand when he needs it.

TESCON SPRIMER is available from dealers in cans with volumes of 400 and 750 millilitres. Other new products from pro clima can be found at www.proclima.de

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