About Daniel Laubscher

Daniel Laubscher hat bei pro clima eine Ausbildung zum Veranstaltungskaufmann absolviert. Er organisiert größere Event und Messen von pro clima, wie die internationale BAU in München und Schulungstouren. Dabei kümmert er sich auch um die Veranstaltungstechnik. Daniel ist auch Teil des Digital Teams. Er ist u.a. Moderator bei den Online-Seminaren der pro clima Wissenswerkstatt, filmt und produziert bei Events und unterstützt die Social Media Auftritte.  In seiner Freizeit organisiert er Camps für Jugendliche und Treffen, bei denen Jugendliche gestärkt werden.

Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (8/8) – Old floor joists in refurbishment projects

Continuation of Part 7: Particular challenges on refurbishment projects

Old floor joists in refurbishment projects /penetrations of masonry/joists

Typical leaks can be found at the joist bearings of timber roof joists in the masonry structure. The bricks between the joists are generally not plastered. On refurbishment projects, joints with the old masonry can lead to leaks; on new buildings, non-mortared butt joints between bricks can cause leaks. Even if a layer of plaster has been applied, airtight joints to the joists are generally neglected. This is indicated by air currents through the joints between old wooden floorboards detected during blower door tests.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (7/8) – Particular challenges on refurbishment projects

Continuation of Part 6: Problem with skylights: adhesive bonds at corners

Airtightness on refurbishment projects is particularly challenging, as uneven subsurfaces and walls that are not straight are commonly encountered. These are often covered over with a lightweight wall made of plasterboard to create a clean, even new surface in refurbishment situations. However, non-sealed elements such as unplastered masonry in the building envelope are generally not taken care of first.

Air flow is possible behind structures of this type, and these structures need to be improved. The rule of thumb here is: applying coatings is better than fitting cladding over these surfaces. It is sufficient to apply a smooth plaster finish to unplastered or porous masonry areas in order to prevent the flow of air. Alternatively, a sprayable plastic sealant can be applied to the surface. To achieve more reliable results, blower door testing during construction can identify weaknesses in this regard at an early stage.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (6/8) – Problem with skylights: adhesive bonds at corners

Continuation of Part 5: Care required at the corners of plastic windows:

A challenging corner joint arises when installing skylights. The membrane is guided up to the surrounding window profile all around the window and has to be stuck there in a reliable, sealed manner, even at the corners. Particular care must be taken at the corners. An experienced tradesperson can achieve an uninterrupted airtight seal here using prefolded adhesive tapes. Prefabricated corners, which may be adapted for the width of the surrounding window profile that is present if necessary, are a reliable alternative.

The corners of skylights always show up first in blower door tests. It is important to start by sealing the corner and then to seal the surrounding window profile all around the window. This challenge can be solved by installation tradespeople by folding adhesive tape to create a corner element.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (5/8) – Care required at the corners of plastic windows:

Continuation of Part 4: The challenge: pipe feed-throughs

The position of the airtight layer must be defined

Leaks at windows. Photo: ‘Zieht wie Hechtsupp’ – the construction portal for leaks, damage to structures and other curiosities.

Plastic windows are commonly used in practice on our building sites, but are often associated with a lot of leaks. This is why providers of blower door measurements like to test the joints around these windows. The reason for this is that air can flow freely in the surrounding window profile. The installation guidelines of the RAL quality seal for windows and doors specifies the closing of surrounding window profiles with a special profile – but this is rarely done in everyday practice. However, these air flows can be interrupted by using some joint adhesive.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (4/8) – The challenge: pipe feed-throughs

Continuation of Part 3: The challenge: cables passing underneath joists

The number of pipe feed-throughs through airtight layers is increasing continuously. The familiar vent pipe for the sanitary drain pipe is no longer the only candidate by any means! However, installation technicians for domestic hot water heating, photovoltaic systems and ventilation systems often show little consideration for this issue. Damage can be avoided by careful planning and early intervention. A lot of prefabricated solutions are now available that can be implemented quickly and cost-effectively.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (3/8) – The challenge: cables passing underneath joists

Continuation of Part 2: The challenge: sealing cable looms

Kabelbaum über Unterzug abdichten
It is recommended to create a cable tunnel in the case of middle purlins or joists where cables come out on the other side.

If cable bundles pass though interior walls, middle purlins or joists and thus penetrate the airtight layer twice, the cables need to be stuck in an airtight manner on both sides. An alternate solution is to create a cable tunnel using prefabricated shaped elements or a box made from airtight wood-based panels. The amount of work involved in this case is significantly lower and the end result is better.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (2/8) – The challenge: sealing cable looms

Continuation of Part 1: Typical leaks: cable feed-throughs for electrical installations

Penetration by single cables and pipes is relatively easy to solve. If adhesive tape is being used, the following steps have proven themselves in practice: first stick the adhesive tape to the cable, and then to the airtight membrane so that an L-shaped adhesive bond with both sides is formed. If more conduits or cables penetrate the airtight layer, the work needed to create an adhesive joint using adhesive tape or adhesive from a tube will be more laborious. Another disadvantage is that the adhesive comes apart as soon as you pull on it.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (1/8) – typical leaks: cable feed-throughs for electrical installations

Properly installed air sealing is the basis for energy-efficient buildings that are protected against damage to structures. In addition, planners and tradespeople are liable for any damage that may occur later in the case of flawed planning and installation. Blower door tests during the construction phase and after completion show whether the values demanded by regulations and standards (German Energy Saving Ordinance, DIN standards) are achieved in practice. These tests also show where leaks are present in the building envelope.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

Continue reading

The AEROSANA VISCONN system: Vapour retarder and airtightness seal that can be simply sprayed on

Everything can be sealed more quickly

Awkward detail features that are difficult to access, penetrations and transitions between components with lots of corners and edges are frequently encountered on building sites. With these challenges, creating airtightness seals can be a time-consuming task.

Airtightness sealing with the AEROSANA VISCONN system – a real all-rounder: whether you are sealing a large surface area or a complicated joint detail – AEROSANA VISCONN ensures permanent airtightness everywhere!

The sprayable AEROSANA VISCONN airtightness sealant offers installation technicians an alternative that they can use to seal complicated construction details just as quickly and easily as large surfaces. The AEROSANA VISCONN system is so versatile in practice that a majority of airtightness challenges that arise can be reliably solved using this product. The spray film is water-based and has achieved excellent values in hazardous substance testing.

Numerous possible interior and exterior applications

AEROSANA VISCONN is suitable for all surfaces typically found in construction, such as plastered or non-plastered masonry, porous panel-form materials or membranes. It can also be used as a bonding primer on rough or dusty subsurfaces and covers cracks and joints of up to 3 mm width. Joints of up to 20 mm width can be painted over using fibre-reinforced AEROSANA VISCONN FIBRE, an additional product in the system. To create airtight seals for bigger holes such as when sealing penetrations of pipes or ties, a piece of AEROSANA FLEECE can be used that is put in place before being painted or sprayed over. Continue reading

Why do I need airtightness sealing at all?

Airtightness sealing has a wide range of significant impacts on buildings. After all, air can flow through the building envelope in an undesired manner if the airtightness sealing is poor. Substances or energy can be transported in this way – this is referred to as convection.

This means that heat leaves the building in an undesired manner during the winter or enters in summertime.

Fuge in der Luftdichtung

A joint with a width of 1 mm and a length of 1 m in a building structure looks small, but has a major impact. The heat losses increase by a factor of 4.8. In addition, up to 0.8 litres of humidity can enter the building structure in a single day.

Scientific studies have shown that the thermal insulation performance can be reduced to just 20 per cent in the case of strong air flow (i.e. through leaks).

Alongside these heat flows, water that is present in the interior in the form of air humidity can enter into building components through leaks in the airtightness. In winter, the temperature in these building components falls. Condensation liquid can then form, which can lead to subsequent damage such as mould.

Unwelcome odours or harmful substances can also spread – and who wants to be able to smell what the neighbours are cooking?

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