The AEROSANA VISCONN system: Vapour retarder and airtightness seal that can be simply sprayed on

Everything can be sealed more quickly

Awkward detail features that are difficult to access, penetrations and transitions between components with lots of corners and edges are frequently encountered on building sites. With these challenges, creating airtightness seals can be a time-consuming task.

Airtightness sealing with the AEROSANA VISCONN system – a real all-rounder: whether you are sealing a large surface area or a complicated joint detail – AEROSANA VISCONN ensures permanent airtightness everywhere!

The sprayable AEROSANA VISCONN airtightness sealant offers installation technicians an alternative that they can use to seal complicated construction details just as quickly and easily as large surfaces. The AEROSANA VISCONN system is so versatile in practice that a majority of airtightness challenges that arise can be reliably solved using this product. The spray film is water-based and has achieved excellent values in hazardous substance testing.

Numerous possible interior and exterior applications

AEROSANA VISCONN is suitable for all surfaces typically found in construction, such as plastered or non-plastered masonry, porous panel-form materials or membranes. It can also be used as a bonding primer on rough or dusty subsurfaces and covers cracks and joints of up to 3 mm width. Joints of up to 20 mm width can be painted over using fibre-reinforced AEROSANA VISCONN FIBRE, an additional product in the system. To create airtight seals for bigger holes such as when sealing penetrations of pipes or ties, a piece of AEROSANA FLEECE can be used that is put in place before being painted or sprayed over. Continue reading

Reliable planning and implementation of window joints

Joints to other building components are always challenging: they are just a few millimetres in width, but have to offer the same performance as an exterior wall with a thickness of 40 centimetres. Alongside the external influences that act on a building component, there are also laws and standards that stipulate requirements that joints have to fulfil. The wishes of clients or investors are additional considerations that have to be taken into account. The quality and performance of window joints are dependent on good planning, installation according to the three-layer principle, and the choice of materials used.

Careful installation is important in order to ensure the performance of the building envelope and to avoid structural damage and mould. The design principle of three functional layers must be taken into account during planning and installation

The design principle – The joint is what counts!

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Hydrosafe: Maximum protection for building components

Anyone who wants to plan, build or live in a building that is free from damage should choose a vapour retarder with an effective hydrosafe value. Hydrosafe? Yes, it sounds complicated but we’ll explain what it means in simple terms in these new proclima.tv videos:

  • Hydrosafe: Maximum protection
  • Some Interesting facts about hydrosafe:

    • Humidity-variable vapour retarders are particularly reliable.
    • Hydrosafe: Maximum protection thanks to a large spread in diffusion resistance value
    • Construction sites during winter months: A vapour retarder must
      1. be sufficiently impermeable = Protection against dampness
      2. but also be extremely permeable later = Maximum drying out
    • Hydrosafe value: sd of a vapour retarder for optimal protection for building components during construction period.
    • Hydrosafe => Maximum protection: against dampness + allows for good drying out
    • Better reliability thanks to vapour retarders with a suitable hydrosafe value.

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Air-tight building – why it is important

Protection from mould and heat loss

The air­proof­ing lay­er pro­tects the in­su­la­tion from mois­ture and con­dens­a­tion from the in­side, en­sures that the in­su­la­tion works ef­fect­ively and provides a healthy in­door liv­ing en­vir­on­ment.

The thermal in­su­la­tion sep­ar­ates the in­door from the out­door cli­mate. The tem­per­at­ure dif­fer­ence between the two cli­mates at­tempts to be­come equal­ised through the flow of air. This means in winter the warm air from the build­ing trans­fers through the struc­tur­al ele­ments to the out­side. The air­proof­ing lay­er pre­vents this air flow, the so-called con­vec­tion, and there­fore the loss of hot air to the out­side. The in­teri­or space is here not her­met­ic­ally sealed off – like us­ing a plastic bag – from the out­side air. In­stead, the ex­change of air from the in­side to the out­side con­tin­ues via dif­fu­sion.

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