BAU 2019: At Stand 200 in Hall B6, the focus is on healthier buildings

pro clima presents projects, products and a guiding principle

How does the selection of construction materials and the professional handling of these materials influence the construction of healthy buildings to live in? This is just one of the questions that MOLL pro clima is considering at BAU 2019. The overall issue of healthier buildings is the focus of the trade fair presence of pro clima, the specialist in windtightness and airtightness. At the heart of Stand 200 in Hall B6, we will be presenting our joint projects with the Sentinel Haus Institut – such as the current research project “My Future Office”, which deals with sustainable, healthier office buildings. However, a significant amount of space is also dedicated to both new and tried-and-tested products that pro clima has developed with the issue of healthy living environments very much in the foreground.

Finding out more, discussing technical issues, experiencing new products at BAU 2019: At the pro clima Stand 200 in Hall B6, everything will be focused on windtight and airtight building envelopes and their importance for achieving healthier buildings.

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Why do I need airtightness sealing at all?

Airtightness sealing has a wide range of significant impacts on buildings. After all, air can flow through the building envelope in an undesired manner if the airtightness sealing is poor. Substances or energy can be transported in this way – this is referred to as convection.

This means that heat leaves the building in an undesired manner during the winter or enters in summertime.

Fuge in der Luftdichtung

A joint with a width of 1 mm and a length of 1 m in a building structure looks small, but has a major impact. The heat losses increase by a factor of 4.8. In addition, up to 0.8 litres of humidity can enter the building structure in a single day.

Scientific studies have shown that the thermal insulation performance can be reduced to just 20 per cent in the case of strong air flow (i.e. through leaks).

Alongside these heat flows, water that is present in the interior in the form of air humidity can enter into building components through leaks in the airtightness. In winter, the temperature in these building components falls. Condensation liquid can then form, which can lead to subsequent damage such as mould.

Unwelcome odours or harmful substances can also spread – and who wants to be able to smell what the neighbours are cooking?

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