Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (8/8) – Old floor joists in refurbishment projects

Continuation of Part 7: Particular challenges on refurbishment projects

Old floor joists in refurbishment projects /penetrations of masonry/joists

Typical leaks can be found at the joist bearings of timber roof joists in the masonry structure. The bricks between the joists are generally not plastered. On refurbishment projects, joints with the old masonry can lead to leaks; on new buildings, non-mortared butt joints between bricks can cause leaks. Even if a layer of plaster has been applied, airtight joints to the joists are generally neglected. This is indicated by air currents through the joints between old wooden floorboards detected during blower door tests.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

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Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (7/8) – Particular challenges on refurbishment projects

Continuation of Part 6: Problem with skylights: adhesive bonds at corners

Airtightness on refurbishment projects is particularly challenging, as uneven subsurfaces and walls that are not straight are commonly encountered. These are often covered over with a lightweight wall made of plasterboard to create a clean, even new surface in refurbishment situations. However, non-sealed elements such as unplastered masonry in the building envelope are generally not taken care of first.

Air flow is possible behind structures of this type, and these structures need to be improved. The rule of thumb here is: applying coatings is better than fitting cladding over these surfaces. It is sufficient to apply a smooth plaster finish to unplastered or porous masonry areas in order to prevent the flow of air. Alternatively, a sprayable plastic sealant can be applied to the surface. To achieve more reliable results, blower door testing during construction can identify weaknesses in this regard at an early stage.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

Continue reading

Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (6/8) – Problem with skylights: adhesive bonds at corners

Continuation of Part 5: Care required at the corners of plastic windows:

A challenging corner joint arises when installing skylights. The membrane is guided up to the surrounding window profile all around the window and has to be stuck there in a reliable, sealed manner, even at the corners. Particular care must be taken at the corners. An experienced tradesperson can achieve an uninterrupted airtight seal here using prefolded adhesive tapes. Prefabricated corners, which may be adapted for the width of the surrounding window profile that is present if necessary, are a reliable alternative.

The corners of skylights always show up first in blower door tests. It is important to start by sealing the corner and then to seal the surrounding window profile all around the window. This challenge can be solved by installation tradespeople by folding adhesive tape to create a corner element.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

Continue reading

Intelligent, effective solutions for joints (5/8) – Care required at the corners of plastic windows:

Continuation of Part 4: The challenge: pipe feed-throughs

The position of the airtight layer must be defined

Leaks at windows. Photo: ‘Zieht wie Hechtsupp’ – the construction portal for leaks, damage to structures and other curiosities.

Plastic windows are commonly used in practice on our building sites, but are often associated with a lot of leaks. This is why providers of blower door measurements like to test the joints around these windows. The reason for this is that air can flow freely in the surrounding window profile. The installation guidelines of the RAL quality seal for windows and doors specifies the closing of surrounding window profiles with a special profile – but this is rarely done in everyday practice. However, these air flows can be interrupted by using some joint adhesive.

This series of articles summarises typical, challenging joint situations and shows how technicians can find practical solutions for these challenges. It also provides an overview of the detail features for which prefabricated solutions are available that allow tradespeople to achieve airtightness in a quick, easy and reliable manner.

Continue reading